Survival of the Branded

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Branding isn’t everything. If you throw enough money at a business, you’re sure to get some traction. If you have a super sales force, you’ll make some inroads. If you are in the right place at the right time, success will come to you, at least for a while.  But a weak brand or no brand will catch up with every entrepreneur somewhere along the way.

Tech companies with an idea, but not a brand disappeared in the tech shakeout of 2000. Many VC funded. “Uber-ish” companies in the mobile space today will probably share the same fate. A company without a brand is just, well vulnerable.

A lot of the discussion in marketing in the last month or so has been about the “slow, then all at once” change in social media. Incrementally, this discipline in marketing has gotten a lot less about “getting” the platforms and a lot more about using them effectively; what you have to pay for and what you get for free. So too has the world of digital advertising gone through upheaval (again.) Not lost in the shuffle has been a new interest in branding – when you can no longer have a “first mover advantage”, digitally speaking, it’s back to basics.

There is a great article in Inc. about Coupons.com and the branding and rebranding that smart companies do. In the 21st century, sitting still isn’t an option.  Understanding your customer and telling your story in a fresh and creative way never gets old.

So branding is back. Long live branding

.headshot newMARYANNE CONLIN IS AN CPG TRAINED MARKETER AND AN AWARD-WINNING DIGITAL EXPERT. SHE SPECIALIZES IN HELPING GROWING BRANDS DEVELOP STRATEGIC  MARKETING PLANS AND EXECUTE THEM EFFECTIVELY. 

CONTACT HER AT REDROPESDIGITAL.COM

FOLLOW HER  ON TWITTER @maryanneconlin

 

 

Instagram Joins Twitter & Facebook in Ending Free Reach

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After 10 plus years of social media growth, we’ve finally come to the place where we can admit, social media is media and you have to pay to play. Boutique platforms and quirky accounts will still occasionally go viral, for a time, but with Twitter and Instagram joining Facebook with algorithmic timelines, we now have to look at social media just as we would any other marketing tool and allocate resources accordingly.

If you’ve done any marketing on Facebook in the last year or so, it has become clear to you, that without boosted posts and paid ads, the level of traction and engagement that you can get organically is limited. Facebook’s algorithmic timeline (showing you what you are most likely to want to see based on what/who you liked/clicked in the past) effectively blocks traction for new content that isn’t pushed out by Facebook ads or supported by other advertising or P.R. efforts (hopefully both.)

Now Twitter and Instagram have joined Facebook, print, T.V. and radio in offering real value for advertising dollars. Yes, it’s still important to create content and have a P.R. program, but perhaps even more than in traditional media, it’s really important to have an ad plan. In other words, please stop believing that social media is the “cheap” way to market a business. Social can be viewed through the same lens as any media, as a tool – it’s part of the P.R. plan. It’s part of the advertising plan.

In some ways it’s more expensive that traditional media. It’s much more content heavy. It requires a high level of skill that has to be both quantitative and qualitative. It’s constantly changing, so it’s difficult to devote the resources to manage it in house.

On the other hand, it’s a key part of any marketing plan. Network TV watching is dropping rapidly as binge-watching on Netflix, etc. increases (up to 35% less!). Print has been on a downward slide for years and radio is impacted by the rise of music apps. On the other hand, over 80% of consumers are on social media.

In some ways, it’s a relief that the top social channels are acting more like traditional media. Less mystery and more strategy will make it easier to create great programs and effectively measure the results.

headshot newMARYANNE CONLIN IS AN CPG TRAINED MARKETER AND AN AWARD-WINNING DIGITAL EXPERT. SHE SPECIALIZES IN HELPING GROWING BRANDS DEVELOP STRATEGIC  MARKETING PLANS AND EXECUTE THEM EFFECTIVELY. 

CONTACT HER AT REDROPESDIGITAL.COM

FOLLOW HER  ON TWITTER @maryanneconlin

 

Tips For Making The Perfect Logo

It’s amazing to me how many poorly designed logos are created by talented designers.

I take that back.

As the client/designer relationship is often fraught with misunderstandings and imperfect knowledge, I’m not surprised. Regardless, there is a way to improve that knowledge, mostly by having a road map to creating effective marketing materials. Since many of our clients have expertise in fields other than marketing, I found the infographic below provides a great starting point for discussion on making a great logo. Thanks to Tim at Daily Infographic  .

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